Tag Archives: data

Do student evaluations measure teaching effectiveness? [Part 3 – Evaluation as symbol]]

By | March 31, 2014

I believe that it is important to think about why these student course evaluation ratings are being obtained, and how that relates to the kinds of measures used. I pointed out in Part 2 that the one-shot end-of-course retrospective rating system cannot obtain ratings valid over the whole term. There are procedures that could obtain valid ratings,

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Do student evaluations measure teaching effectiveness? [Part 2]

By | March 30, 2014

This topic is too good to let go without a reprise; this post is based in part on a final post that I made to the LinkedIn discussion I mentioned earlier.

The point has been made repeatedly and correctly that feedback has to be multidimensional, reflecting different aspects of the teaching. Almost every survey tries to assess these different aspects.

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Do student evaluations measure teaching effectiveness?

By | March 29, 2014

For a couple of weeks now, there has been an energetic discussion on the Higher Education Teaching and Learning discussion  board on LinkedIn around the question, “Do student evaluations measure teaching effectiveness?” In the course of some 335 comments, including several of mine, the discussion has predictably gone around the circle several times.

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Discrimination, representation, and ecological fallacies

By | February 6, 2014

​Back in November 2013, Alice Marwick published an article in Wired Online entitled “Silicon Valley Isn’t a Meritocracy. And It’s Dangerous to Hero-Worship Entrepreneurs”. In it, she basically claimed that women and minorities were being systematically cut out of the Silicon Valley elite by assorted Powers That Be. It’s an interesting article, and as might be suspected,

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Respecting the data

By | January 20, 2013

ozIn today’s posting on The Conversation, a very interesting Australian blog discussing current issues, there is a very interesting article by Michael Brown, entitled “Faking waves: how the NRA and pro-gun Americans abuse Australian crime stats.” Essentially, his point is that statistics regarding the Australian experience with gun control,

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An interesting study

By | December 30, 2012

nomo-globeI said in yesterday’s post that I would talk more about the Russo-Fitzgerald-Eveland study on the evaluation of training programs for resident physicians. It’s an interesting piece of research in many ways, both substantively and in terms of process. It’s basically a report on Ruthann Russo’s dissertation research; Steve Fitzgerald was her dissertation chair. The study was completed and passed before I ever got involved with it.

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